Hammertoe Surgery

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Foot Problems

General Statistics

Achilles Problems

Achilles Tendonitis | Peroneal Tendon Dislocation| Xanthomas of the Achilles Tendon

Ankle Problems

Ankle Sprain | Chronic Lateral Ankle Pain | Osteochondritis

Arch and Ball Problems

Flat Feet | Metatarsalgia | Plantar Fibromas | Sesamoiditis

Common Foot Injuries

Ankle Sprain Injuries | Broken Ankle | Fractures | Osteochondritis | Osteochondromas | Shin Splints | Sports Injuries

Deformities

Amniotic Band Syndrome | Bunions | Claw Toe | Clubfoot | Dysplasia | Flat Feet | Gordon Syndrome | Haglunds Deformity | Hallux Limitus | Hallux Rigidus | Hallux Varus | Hammertoes | Jackson Weiss Syndrome | Mallet Toes | Metatarsalgia | Osteomyelitis | Overlapping or Underlapping Toes | Peroneal Tendon Dislocation | Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction | Sesamoiditis | Spurs | Tarsal Coalition

Diabetes and Your Feet

Diseases of the Foot

Arthritis | Cancer | Charcot Foot | Freiberg's Disease | Gout | Kaposi's Sarcoma | Kohler's Disease | Maffucci's Syndrome | Ollier's Disease | Raynaud's Disease | Seiver's Disease

Fungus Problems

Common Fungal Problems | Athletes Foot | Fungal Nails | Other Tips | Prevention

Heel Problems

Haglunds Deformity | Heel Callus | Heel Fissures | Plantar Fasciitis

Nail Problems

Black Toenails | Ingrown Toenails | Nail Fungus

Skin Problems

Allergies | Athletes Foot | Blisters | Burning Feet | Calluses | Corns | Cysts | Frostbite | Fungus | Gangrene | Lesions | Psoriasis | Smelly Feet and Foot Odor | Swelling | Ulcers | Warts

Toe Problems

Bunions | Claw Toe | Digital Deformity | Hallux Limitus | Hallux Rigidis | Hallux Varus | Hammertoes | Intoeing | Overlapping or Underlapping Toes | Subungal Exotosis | Turf Toe

Vascular/Nerve Problems

Acrocyanosis | Alcoholic Neuropathy | Chilblains (Cold Feet) | Erythromelalgia | Ischemic Foot | Neuroma | Spasms | Venous Stasis

Overview of Feet and Ankle Problems Basic Foot Care Guidelines

Medical Care

Diagnostic Procedures

Computed Tomography | MRI | Ultrasound | X-Rays

Orthotics Pain Management

General Information and Tips | Pain Management for Specific Conditions

Surgical Procedures

General Information | Achilles Surgery | Ankle Surgery | Arthritis Surgery | Arthroscopy | Bunion Surgery | Cyst Removal | Flatfoot Correction |Heel Surgery | Metatarsal Surgery | Nerve Surgery | Toe Surgery

Therapies

Athlete's Foot Treatment | Cryotherapy | Extracorporeal Shock Wave | Fungal Nail Treatment | Physical Therapy | Iontophoresis | Neurolysis

Fitness and Your Feet

Exercise Those Toes | Aerobics | Fitness and Your Feet | Stretching | Walking and Your Feet | Jogging and Running

Sports and Your Feet

Baseball | Basketball | Cycling | Golf | Jogging and Running | Tennis

Foot Care

Basic Foot Care Guidelines | Athletic Foot Care | Blisters | Childrens Feet | Corns and Calluses | Diabetic Foot Care | Foot Care for Seniors | Foot Self Exam | Pedicures | Your Feet at Work | Bunion Prevention | Burning Feet | Ingrown Nails | Nutrition For Your Feet

Women's Feet

High Heels | Stockings? | Pregnancy | Women Over 65

Foot Odor and Smelly Feet

Prevention | Treating Foot Odor

Shoes

Facts About Shoes | Anatomy of a Shoe | Athletic Shoe Guidelines | Children's Shoes | Corrective and Prescription Shoes | What to Look For | Men's Shoes | Women's Shoes | Your Footprint | Wear Patterns

Links

Our Community Partners | Associations/Groups | Government | Online Resources | Our Partners in Foot & Ankle Health

Hammertoe is a deformity of the second, third, or fourth toes. In this condition, the toe is bent at the middle joint, causing it to resemble a hammer. Left untreated, hammertoes can become inflexible and painful, requiring surgery.

Hammertoe surgery can be done on an outpatient basis in the doctor's office or a surgery center using a local anesthetic, sometimes combined with sedation. The surgery takes about 15 minutes to perform. Up to four small incisions are made and the tendons are rebalanced around the toe so that it no longer curls. Patients usually can walk immediately after the surgery wearing a special surgical shoe. Minimal or no pain medication is needed following the surgery.

Icing and elevation of the foot is recommended during the first week following the procedure to prevent excessive swelling and promote healing. It is also important that the dressing be kept clean and dry to prevent infection. Two weeks after the surgery, the sutures are removed and a wide athletic shoe can replace the post-operative surgical shoe. Patients can then gradually increase their walking and other physical activities.


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